Eliz Greene
Eliz Greene
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Take advantage of a few days off from your regular routine to unplug and let your body catch up with all you ask it to do!

Most of us use some sort of electronic devices to stay connected. These days one hand-held device can allow you to take calls, send e-mail, update your Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter status, surf the net and text you pals.

But I ask you this… Do you NEED to be that connected all the time?

cyberoverload-front-250Dr. Joanne Cantor, author of Conquer CyberOverload has spent years researching the brain and tells us constant connection squashes our creativity and increases our stress. Dr. Cantor’s book has fascinating information and concrete example why your brain can’t really multitask. I strongly suggest you get her book and find out how to reduce your stress and increase your productivity by managing your connection to the cyber-world.

In the meantime, why not take advantage of the break in your routine to unplug a bit? You may be surprised how calm and focused you’ll feel! It is a great way to Pay Your Body Back™ for a year of crazy connectivity!

How to unplug:

Wear real jewelry in place of your Blue-Tooth: While it may feel like a part of your ear, remove it. It may be pretty, it may be expensive, but it isn’t jewelry and doesn’t belong at the holiday dinner table or family gathering.

Replace “Facebook” with face-time: As tempting as it may be, when you sit down to a meal or a conversation, don’t engage you gadgets.  You may think you can participate in a conversation or meal and text at the same time – but you can’t. Unless you are on-call, leave your gadgets in your pocket – or better yet, turn them off.  Your digestive system and dining companions will thank you. Social interaction is essential to good health, as is paying attention to what you eat.

Do something with your hands: Finding it hard to disengage? Find a way to distract yourself. Bake cookies, help set the table, make a craft, read a book, hold a child, play a board game… anything to keep your hands off the gadget! Refrain from texting, updating your status or sending emails.

Get outside: Interacting with nature – even for 10 minutes lowers stress and calms the body. Go out notice the sounds, sights, and smells.

Choose the time you connect: Allow your body to wake and drift off to sleep without electronic interruption. Read, listen to music, talk to your spouse, or have a cup of tea for the first and last 30 minutes you are awake. Ban the television from the bedroom, turn off your cell phone, and walk past the computer or hand-held device without checking for messages. Choose one or two times during the day to check in (if you must) with messages and social media.

Enjoy the break in your normal routine. Perhaps you’ll find you like the unplugged you so much you’ll want to incorporate unplugged time into your life more often.  I hope so!

Wishing you low stress and great success.

Get more valuable information in Eliz’s new book, The Busy Woman’s Guide to a Healthy Heart, or in her Award Winning Blog.

Eliz Greene survived a massive heart attack while seven-months pregnant with twins, struggled to lose the 80 pounds gained during her pregnancy, and searched for a way to hold on to the perspective and passion she found in her near-death experience. Drawing on her background as an adaptive movement specialist, Eliz developed simple strategies and tips to help other busy women be more active, eat better and manage your stress.

As the Director of the Embrace Your Heart Wellness Initiative, Eliz travels the country energizing and inspiring audiences in keynotes and workshops on women’s heart health. She writes one of the top 100 health and wellness blogs. Find more at www.EmbraceYourHeart.com.

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Eliz Greene

About Eliz Greene

Eliz Greene survived a heart attack at age 35 while seven months pregnant with twins. Her down-to-earth strategies to manage stress and improve heart health and reduce stress are used by thousands of busy people all over the world. She is a motivational wellness speaker, author, and job stress researcher. Visit elizgreene.com to book Eliz for your next event.

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